The Latest

Sep 17, 2014 / 10 notes

Outfit of the day!

I should probably take better care of my pre-gan leather boots because they won’t be replaced with more leather.

Sep 16, 2014 / 1,875 notes
  • Corporation: *Destroys the environment*
  • Corporation: *Puts smaller stores out of business and creates an inescapable monopoly using unethical business practices*
  • Corporation: *Uses child and other exploited labour in developing nations*
  • Corporation: *Creates an endless cycle of wage slavery and dependence on a minimum wage that's below living costs*
  • Corporation: *Makes a tokenistic and safe signal of support of LGBT rights which aligns with a clear majority of societies moral beliefs in 2014*
  • Tumblr: OMFG YOU GUYS ARE AMAZING AND I LOVE YOU SO MUCH IF YOU DON'T SUPPORT THIS COMPANY AND REBLOG THIS OBNOXIOUS 30 GIF SET JUST UNFOLLOW ME AND GO BACK TO YOUR FUNERAL PICKET WESTBORO BAPTIST CHURCH LOVER
Sep 16, 2014 / 10 notes

It’s beginning to look a lot like Fol-som Toys in every store. But the prettiest sight to see, Is the lover that will be Panting at your door.

Making garters! I need to add a gator glip to hold up my stockings and add some more pizazz into the mix but it’s coming along well.

Oddly, I had to go to a few stores in hunt of cheap plastic vampire fangs. Cliffs in the Castro was 100% sold out by Sept 10th!
Sep 16, 2014 / 2 notes

Making garters! I need to add a gator glip to hold up my stockings and add some more pizazz into the mix but it’s coming along well.

Oddly, I had to go to a few stores in hunt of cheap plastic vampire fangs. Cliffs in the Castro was 100% sold out by Sept 10th!

Sep 16, 2014 / 3,613 notes

zaynmalikssweetheart1997 said: Okay that stupid ass Joan rivers twitter post? Racism has nothing to do with feminism. Shut up and sit down because your making yourself look ignorant.

owning-my-truth:

To the contrary, clueless white woman, racism has been central to white feminism from the beginning. Some quotes via The-Toast and this article:

Susan B. Anthony:

“What words can express her [the white woman’s] humiliation when, at the close of this long conflict, the government which she had served so faithfully held her unworthy of a voice in its councils, while it recognized as the political superiors of all the noble women of the nation the negro men just emerged from slavery, and not only totally illiterate, but also densely ignorant of every public question.” 

Elizabeth Cady Stanton:

“What will we and our daughters suffer if these degraded black men are allowed to have the rights that would make them even worse than our Saxon fathers?”

More Elizabeth Cady Stanton:

“American women of wealth, education, virtue and refinement, if you do not wish the lower orders of Chinese, Africans, Germans and Irish, with their low ideas of womanhood, to make laws for you and your daughters … awake to the danger of your present position and demand that woman, too, shall be represented in the government!”

Belle Kearney:

“The enfranchisement of women would insure immediate and durable white supremacy, honestly attained, for upon unquestioned authority it is stated that in every southern State but one there are more educated women than all the illiterate voters, white and black, native and foreign, combined. As you probably know, of all the women in the South who can read and write, ten out of every eleven are white. When it comes to the proportion of property between the races, that of the white outweighs that of the black immeasurably.”

Anna Howard Shaw:

“You have put the ballot in the hands of your black men, thus making them political superiors of white women. Never before in the history of the world have men made former slaves the political masters of their former mistresses!”

Laura Clay:

“The white men, reinforced by the educated white women, could ‘snow under’ the Negro vote in every State, and the white race would maintain its supremacy without corrupting or intimidating the Negroes.”

Frances Willard:

“Alien illiterates rule our cities today; the saloon is their palace, and the toddy stick their scepter. The colored race multiplies like the locusts of Egypt.”

Carrie Chapman Catt:

“White supremacy will be strengthened, not weakened, by women’s suffrage.”

Rebecca Ann Latimer Felton:

“I do not want to see a negro man walk to the polls and vote on who should handle my tax money, while I myself cannot vote at all…When there is not enough religion in the pulpit to organize a crusade against sin; nor justice in the court house to promptly punish crime; nor manhood enough in the nation to put a sheltering arm about innocence and virtue—-if it needs lynching to protect woman’s dearest possession from the ravening human beasts—-then I say lynch, a thousand times a week if necessary.”

So please spare me with your ahistorical bullshit.

(h/t The-Toast, AnarchaLibrary)

Sep 16, 2014 / 670 notes

black-australia:

MisSpelled is about five girls who mysteriously acquire magical abilities and how they learn to deal with them and one another. It’s funny and dramatic and tons of fun for you and your friends! It features an all women of color cast and celebrates different body sizes.

We are gearing into our kickstarter phase and need support from you!

Binge Watch Our Show

Promologue

Episode 1

Episode 2

Episode 3

Episode 4

Please spread the word! MisSpelled needs you! 

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(via poc-creators)

Sep 16, 2014 / 22,619 notes
give-a-fuck-about-nature:

Natural and Harmless Alternatives to Garden Pesticides
Unfortunately, many people choose to use cruel methods that either injure or kill garden visitors. I think the problem is that most people are not aware that there are other ways to protect your garden that don’t require you to harm any living beings.
The best way to keep your garden healthy is to really be a part of your garden. You will be amazed at the big, complex world going on in your backyard (or front yard, or patio or whatever you have the space for). Sit yourself down one day in your garden and just look closely and quietly. Incredible stuff.
Planting
You can plant some “sacrifice” plants in various parts of the yard which is often ones that we don’t like so much, but the bugs do. These include plants from the cabbage family and some others that you can let go to seed purposely. These will naturally attract the most destructive bugs. This may entail some experimentation on your behalf, to note where they like to hang-out the most. 
Compost
Consider having an open style compost bin. You can have both an open version and a closed one. The open bin can be made with just a few old car tyres stacked up beside the house, where it is too shady to grow anything. Throw plant clippings and some old cabbage/broccoli leaves/plants in there and deposit the collected bugs there. That way they have some food and a way to get out if they wish.
Moving on
Another method is to take an empty bucket or container and carefully remove the caterpillars or other bug that you can spot. Take these to your ‘sacrifice’ plants or your open compost bin, depending on how many you have. Use gloves to do this as some hairy caterpillars can give you a nasty rash.
Trick ‘em
White cabbage moths, which look like white butterflies with black spots, will lay tonnes of eggs on your cabbage family plants (broccoli, bok choy, brussel sprouts etc) but you can trick them into thinking the plants are in a territory of other moths. Thread some of the white, Styrofoam peanut-shaped packing thingies (or cut out shapes from plastic containers) onto string and hang them above your plants. These look like other white moths have already taken those plants, and often encourages them to find somewhere else. Worth a try anyway.
Nice Predators
If you have aphids, you will probably have ladybugs in the vicinity. Most of the time they will migrate to the affected plants, however, if you find a plant covered in aphids and no lady-bugs, just take a look around for them else-where in your garden and carefully transfer a couple. I don’t know how they do it, but these freshly fed lady-bugs will soon send out the appropriate signals and others will come. I notice most aphid problems disappear after a few days.
Annoy them
Snails and slugs always seem to attack the freshly planted seedlings after a nice rain drop or too. Don’t use snail bait, firstly as they are dangerous to the kids and dogs, and as they are nasty to the snails. Use copper strips and saw-dust to stop them from getting into the beds. The copper gives them an annoying electric zap as they crawl across them and saw dust also irritates them. Be sure to use dust from non-treated wood as older-style treated wood can contain nasties like arsenic!
Distract them
Pill Bugs or slater beetles or roly poly bugs are the janitors of the garden, cleaning up all rotting fruit and vegetables. Sometimes they get a bit excited and eat stuff that you can use still. They love eating ripe strawberries so make sure to pick them every day. Keep them distracted by leaving a few orange halves around your garden. They will flock to them. If you do find them eating something you don’t want them to, gently brush them off and give the fruit or veg a good wash before eating it.
Block them
We all have plastic bottles or cartons left over from juice/milk substitutes. Before putting these in your recycle bin, cut them into sections about 10-15 cms high. Simply cut through the middle section of the carton leaving a ring like section, open both top and bottom. Place these protective guards around your seedlings, pushing them a little way into the ground, until they are established. These will stop most slugs or snails getting to them. Make sure you take them off though as I have forgotten a couple in the past, on the large plants. Trickly to cut them off without damaging the plant stems. They will keep for many seasons as long as you wash well and store them out of the weather.
Build up
If at all possible, build your garden beds up with raised beds. You can try out some second hand (imperfect) cement blocks. They have a lovely textured finish like bluestones and the slugs/snails don’t like crawling up them. Bonus: they are simple to keep weed free and are easy on your back. They are about 2 ½ feet high and you can overplant them to your heart’s content. Solves any rabbit issues too. Other products you can use are recycled tin, reclaimed wooden train sleepers, old bricks or whatever you can get your hands which is free or at least doesn’t cost too much $. Remember: one person’s garbage can be another person’s treasure…
Netting
Use netting to stop birds and bats from eating all of your fruit but make sure that they can see it (or hear it in the bat’s case). Add some old, shiny CDs to the netting that act as a further deterrent or warning. They also look pretty, reflecting light around the garden! Make sure you check your nets for any creatures that may have gotten stuck. Alternatively, if you are feeling generous, leave off the nets and share with your bird/bat friends.
A lot of pest control will be a bit of a hit & miss affair and require some experimentation. These are ways which I have found to work in my little patch of earth so I would encourage you to try these, and try out your own ideas. Just like most recipes can be turned vegan, most problems in the garden can be solved cruelty-free. I would be happy to help out with any specific pest issues that you may be experiencing. Just drop me a line. I would love to hear any suggests that you may have too!
Bonus!
Aphids (plant lice): Plant chives, marigolds, mint, basil, or cilantro or place aluminum foil at the base of your plants. The foil reflects light onto the undersides of the leaves, which scares away aphids.
Ants: If ants are coming in through the cracks of doors and windows, pour a line of cream of tartar where they enter the house, and they will not cross over it. A cinnamon stick, coffee grinds, chili pepper, paprika, cloves, or dried peppermint leaves near the openings will repel ants. You can also squeeze the juice of a lemon at the entry spot and leave the peel there. Planting mint around the foundation of the house will also keep ants away. Place cloves of garlic around indoor and outdoor ant pathways.
Cockroaches: Create sachets of catnip and place them throughout the infested area (your cat will love you!). Cockroaches like high places, so put a few sachets on top of shelves and other elevated surfaces. Bay leaves, cucumbers, and garlic can also help to keep cockroaches away.
Codling moths: Use a cheesecloth square full of lavender, chives and garlic, or cedar chips. Try adding cedar oil, rosemary, dried lemon peels, or rose petals.
Deer: Place some soap shavings or used cat litter along the ground to create a boundary between their grazing area and your garden. Also try hanging a salt lick in their path to distract them from your plants.
Grasshoppers: Simply spray garlic oil where you don’t want them, or plant calendula, horehound (a bitter herb), or cilantro.
Japanese beetles: Try chives, garlic, rue, and catnip.
Mice: Use mint plants, especially peppermint plants! Mice really dislike peppermint and will avoid any areas where it grows.
Mites (spider and clover): Try planting alder, coriander, or dill, and use rye mulch and wheat mulch.
Rabbits: Sprinkle chili pepper around plants (it must be reapplied if it gets wet). Install oven racks around plants. Rabbits tend to dislike their texture and the way that they feel on their feet. Other natural rabbit repellents include bellflowers, astilbes, asters, yarrows, cranesbills, hostas, lavender, sage, and other textured or thorny plants.
Slugs: Place mint, lemon balm, human hair (remove excess hair from hair brushes and place in gardens), pine needles, cosmos, sage, or parsley in your garden.
Ticks and fleas: Plant mint, sweet woodruff, rosemary, and lavender. Also try placing cedar chips in your garden. They smell great to you … but not to fleas and ticks!
Happy vegan organic gardening.
Sep 16, 2014 / 303 notes

give-a-fuck-about-nature:

Natural and Harmless Alternatives to Garden Pesticides

Unfortunately, many people choose to use cruel methods that either injure or kill garden visitors. I think the problem is that most people are not aware that there are other ways to protect your garden that don’t require you to harm any living beings.

The best way to keep your garden healthy is to really be a part of your garden. You will be amazed at the big, complex world going on in your backyard (or front yard, or patio or whatever you have the space for). Sit yourself down one day in your garden and just look closely and quietly. Incredible stuff.

  • Planting

You can plant some “sacrifice” plants in various parts of the yard which is often ones that we don’t like so much, but the bugs do. These include plants from the cabbage family and some others that you can let go to seed purposely. These will naturally attract the most destructive bugs. This may entail some experimentation on your behalf, to note where they like to hang-out the most. 

  • Compost

Consider having an open style compost bin. You can have both an open version and a closed one. The open bin can be made with just a few old car tyres stacked up beside the house, where it is too shady to grow anything. Throw plant clippings and some old cabbage/broccoli leaves/plants in there and deposit the collected bugs there. That way they have some food and a way to get out if they wish.

  • Moving on

Another method is to take an empty bucket or container and carefully remove the caterpillars or other bug that you can spot. Take these to your ‘sacrifice’ plants or your open compost bin, depending on how many you have. Use gloves to do this as some hairy caterpillars can give you a nasty rash.

  • Trick ‘em

White cabbage moths, which look like white butterflies with black spots, will lay tonnes of eggs on your cabbage family plants (broccoli, bok choy, brussel sprouts etc) but you can trick them into thinking the plants are in a territory of other moths. Thread some of the white, Styrofoam peanut-shaped packing thingies (or cut out shapes from plastic containers) onto string and hang them above your plants. These look like other white moths have already taken those plants, and often encourages them to find somewhere else. Worth a try anyway.

  • Nice Predators

If you have aphids, you will probably have ladybugs in the vicinity. Most of the time they will migrate to the affected plants, however, if you find a plant covered in aphids and no lady-bugs, just take a look around for them else-where in your garden and carefully transfer a couple. I don’t know how they do it, but these freshly fed lady-bugs will soon send out the appropriate signals and others will come. I notice most aphid problems disappear after a few days.

  • Annoy them

Snails and slugs always seem to attack the freshly planted seedlings after a nice rain drop or too. Don’t use snail bait, firstly as they are dangerous to the kids and dogs, and as they are nasty to the snails. Use copper strips and saw-dust to stop them from getting into the beds. The copper gives them an annoying electric zap as they crawl across them and saw dust also irritates them. Be sure to use dust from non-treated wood as older-style treated wood can contain nasties like arsenic!

  • Distract them

Pill Bugs or slater beetles or roly poly bugs are the janitors of the garden, cleaning up all rotting fruit and vegetables. Sometimes they get a bit excited and eat stuff that you can use still. They love eating ripe strawberries so make sure to pick them every day. Keep them distracted by leaving a few orange halves around your garden. They will flock to them. If you do find them eating something you don’t want them to, gently brush them off and give the fruit or veg a good wash before eating it.

  • Block them

We all have plastic bottles or cartons left over from juice/milk substitutes. Before putting these in your recycle bin, cut them into sections about 10-15 cms high. Simply cut through the middle section of the carton leaving a ring like section, open both top and bottom. Place these protective guards around your seedlings, pushing them a little way into the ground, until they are established. These will stop most slugs or snails getting to them. Make sure you take them off though as I have forgotten a couple in the past, on the large plants. Trickly to cut them off without damaging the plant stems. They will keep for many seasons as long as you wash well and store them out of the weather.

  • Build up

If at all possible, build your garden beds up with raised beds. You can try out some second hand (imperfect) cement blocks. They have a lovely textured finish like bluestones and the slugs/snails don’t like crawling up them. Bonus: they are simple to keep weed free and are easy on your back. They are about 2 ½ feet high and you can overplant them to your heart’s content. Solves any rabbit issues too. Other products you can use are recycled tin, reclaimed wooden train sleepers, old bricks or whatever you can get your hands which is free or at least doesn’t cost too much $. Remember: one person’s garbage can be another person’s treasure…

  • Netting

Use netting to stop birds and bats from eating all of your fruit but make sure that they can see it (or hear it in the bat’s case). Add some old, shiny CDs to the netting that act as a further deterrent or warning. They also look pretty, reflecting light around the garden! Make sure you check your nets for any creatures that may have gotten stuck. Alternatively, if you are feeling generous, leave off the nets and share with your bird/bat friends.

A lot of pest control will be a bit of a hit & miss affair and require some experimentation. These are ways which I have found to work in my little patch of earth so I would encourage you to try these, and try out your own ideas. Just like most recipes can be turned vegan, most problems in the garden can be solved cruelty-free. I would be happy to help out with any specific pest issues that you may be experiencing. Just drop me a line. I would love to hear any suggests that you may have too!

Bonus!

  • Aphids (plant lice): Plant chives, marigolds, mint, basil, or cilantro or place aluminum foil at the base of your plants. The foil reflects light onto the undersides of the leaves, which scares away aphids.
  • Ants: If ants are coming in through the cracks of doors and windows, pour a line of cream of tartar where they enter the house, and they will not cross over it. A cinnamon stick, coffee grinds, chili pepper, paprika, cloves, or dried peppermint leaves near the openings will repel ants. You can also squeeze the juice of a lemon at the entry spot and leave the peel there. Planting mint around the foundation of the house will also keep ants away. Place cloves of garlic around indoor and outdoor ant pathways.
  • Cockroaches: Create sachets of catnip and place them throughout the infested area (your cat will love you!). Cockroaches like high places, so put a few sachets on top of shelves and other elevated surfaces. Bay leaves, cucumbers, and garlic can also help to keep cockroaches away.
  • Codling moths: Use a cheesecloth square full of lavender, chives and garlic, or cedar chips. Try adding cedar oil, rosemary, dried lemon peels, or rose petals.
  • Deer: Place some soap shavings or used cat litter along the ground to create a boundary between their grazing area and your garden. Also try hanging a salt lick in their path to distract them from your plants.
  • Grasshoppers: Simply spray garlic oil where you don’t want them, or plant calendula, horehound (a bitter herb), or cilantro.
  • Japanese beetles: Try chives, garlic, rue, and catnip.
  • Mice: Use mint plants, especially peppermint plants! Mice really dislike peppermint and will avoid any areas where it grows.
  • Mites (spider and clover): Try planting alder, coriander, or dill, and use rye mulch and wheat mulch.
  • Rabbits: Sprinkle chili pepper around plants (it must be reapplied if it gets wet). Install oven racks around plants. Rabbits tend to dislike their texture and the way that they feel on their feet. Other natural rabbit repellents include bellflowers, astilbes, asters, yarrows, cranesbills, hostas, lavender, sage, and other textured or thorny plants.
  • Slugs: Place mint, lemon balm, human hair (remove excess hair from hair brushes and place in gardens), pine needles, cosmos, sage, or parsley in your garden.
  • Ticks and fleas: Plant mint, sweet woodruff, rosemary, and lavender. Also try placing cedar chips in your garden. They smell great to you … but not to fleas and ticks!

Happy vegan organic gardening.

(via give-a-fuck-about-nature)

pag-asaharibon:


not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the PhilippinesThe Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:
Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. 
Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipina, the first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.
Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US
Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.
Articles 
Filipinas who were first in PH history
I Am… Woman: Historic Filipinas
#SexTalk: Who is the Filipina of today?
Sampaguita Girl: The Pinay Activist Timeline
Women play key role in PH peace process
VIDEO: Where does the Filipino woman stand today?
Of race and gender clashes: Do women rise above labels?
'Breaking the Silence': The truth about abortion
Defending Filipino women from stereotypes
Importing, exporting stereotypes: How do global Pinays cope?
Barbara Jane Reyes: Virtual Blog Tour, Is Pinay Lit a Genre, and Tagging Others
Books
Denise Cruz’s Transpacific Femininities: The Making of the Modern Filipina
Mina Roces’ Women’s Movements and the Filipina 1986-2008
Melinda L. de Jesús’ Pinay Power: Peminist Critical Theory (reprinted this year)
chidtalk’s recommendations
A systems approach to improving maternal health in the Philippines by Dale Huntington, Eduardo Banzon, and Zenaida Dy Recidoro
Does Feminism Have to Address Race? by Latoya Peterson
Early Feminism in the Philippines by Athena Lydia Casambre and Steven Rood
Feminism and race in the Philippines
Feminism and the present image of Filipino women
Filipiniana: Philippine Women’s Studies
News From the Tropics: Is there Feminism in the Philippines?
Philippines: Feminists Converse on Social Movement Building
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Cicely Richard
The changing role of women in Philippine society by G. Fitzsimmon
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Zakiya Mahomed
Tumblr posts
chidtalk’s post on Filipin@s and Feminism
pinoy-culture’s 10 Kickass Pilipina Warriors in History That You Probably Never Heard Of
Sep 16, 2014 / 9,641 notes

pag-asaharibon:

not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the Philippines

The Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:

  • Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo
  • Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
  • Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipinathe first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
  • Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.

Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US

Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.

Articles 

Books

chidtalk’s recommendations

Tumblr posts

(via notyourexrotic)

platinia:



Bottled up emotions.

This is art
Sep 16, 2014 / 477,279 notes

platinia:

Bottled up emotions.

This is art

(via sin-sex-satan)

Sep 15, 2014 / 269 notes

Bauhaus getting all made up backstage during Gotham.

(via nicereminders)

We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.

They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.

Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.

~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression.

From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’. (via jacobwren)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Sep 15, 2014 / 10,075 notes
Sep 15, 2014 / 95,844 notes

warrenbuchholz:

"Stop Victim Blaming" campaign poster series.

(via storiesandconjure)

Sep 15, 2014 / 2,210 notes

dynamicafrica:

In Photos: The Agbogbloshie Problem.

Waste management in many African countries is a major problem.  From littering, to proper sewer and refuse disposal, air pollution and even access to clean water, the basic needs of many African citizens are ignored by those responsible for for carrying out these services. Across the leadership spectrum, from local municipalities and national governments, these failures often fall into a larger and highly disturbing trend of citizen neglect within many African countries.

Forced to  resort to their own initiatives, it’s not unsurprising to hear and see people across the continent carrying out their own form of waste management and address the health and sanitation issues in their own communities, leading to both negative and positive consequences. Although many are familiar with the West’s portrayal of Somali pirates as money-hungry gun-toting kidnappers (see: Captain Phillips), their story is much more complex than that. It begins with the dumping of toxic waste by and the looting of their seas by foreign countries, and progresses with action by local Somali’s attempting to defend their coastline. Similarly, in southeastern Nigerian where oil pollution remains a continuous health hazard and danger to the surrounding flora and fauna, bands of militant groups such as MEND took up arms against the local government and private oil companies responsible for the exploitation of their resources.

Although not as drastic, in terms of the use of arms, as the above examples, Ghana is another such country were citizens have found their own way to deal with toxic and improper disposal of waste in their communities.

Over the past several years, various images and documentaries have highlighted one area of the country in particular. In what was once a wetland and recreation area, e-waste now mars the former picturesque landscape, causing mass-scale pollution in the process. Agbogbloshie is the world’s biggest e-waste site that the around 40, 000 settlers have nicknamed ‘Sodom and Gomorrah’. Most of the ‘workers’ here are young men aged between 7-25 who sift through the e-waste in search of resellable materials, such as copper, earning around $2.50. As a result of the intense and toxic labour they engage in, many of these young men succumb to a myriad of diseases such as untreated wounds, back and joint problems, damage to their lungs and other internal organs, eye issues, chronic nausea, anorexia, respiratory problems, insomnia, and worst of all, cancer.

Even in countries like South Africa with better health infrastructure, miners face a similar dilemma where, faced with unemployment, many are exposed to hazardous conditions through their work and the lifestyle that migrant life facilitates.

With little to no access to basic and adequate healthcare, many often succumb to these illnesses. Not only does the waste have a direct impact on both the short- and long-term health of nearby residents, aesthetically, Agbogbloshie is far from a pretty site. Where small mounds and sizeable heaps of rubbish in Lagos disturb me when walking the cities hot and humid busy streets, I can only imagine how this ugly site and the government neglect psychologically affects those forced to accommodate it.

The images above are from a photographic study carried out by Kevin McElvaney and featured on Al Jazeera’s website.

What I love most about these photos is that, whether intentionally or not, McElvaney features most of the single individual photos on a make-shift ‘podium’ (resourcefulness, once again) almost as if to say that these people are above the rubbish that surrounds them. Not only in a literal sense, but in a figurative sense as well. 

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All Africa, All the Time

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Sep 13, 2014 / 430 notes