The Latest

Oct 2, 2014 / 20,868 notes

millennialau:

Rev Sekou kneeled between protesters and police and prayed, then was thrown into a police vehicle with blood smears all inside of it.

(via lezbuild-s)

medievalpoc:


aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School
Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat
Brazil (early 1700s)
Oil on canvas
Philadelphia private collection
[x], [x]
I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:
Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.
Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).
The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.
If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???
How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:
women weren’t artists
Black people weren’t artists
Black people were enslaved
Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”
^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.
If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.
Oct 2, 2014 / 1,979 notes

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School

Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat

Brazil (early 1700s)

Oil on canvas

Philadelphia private collection

[x], [x]

I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:

Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.

Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).

The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.

If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???

How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:

  • women weren’t artists
  • Black people weren’t artists
  • Black people were enslaved
  • Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
  • Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
  • white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
  • gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”

^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.

If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

(via medievalpoc)

Oct 2, 2014 / 108,782 notes

rklipman:

cynfinitebeyond:

rubyvroom:

Sorry for the extremely lengthy post on your dashes but this is so important

No sorry. No need to apologize for a mandatory post.

if you can somehow not reblog this, I don’t want to know you

(via seabunker)

Your heart was bigger
than what theirs could hold.
Remember this -
there is nothing wrong
with your love.
Pavana पवन (via godinthebrokenness)

(via godinthebrokenness)

Oct 1, 2014 / 235 notes
You are in an in-between,
in a world with no memories,
so forget your hands and what
they’ve done before.
Forget your fingers.
Float in this kingdom.

Be the kind of brave you’ve only ever read about
in books, then be braver than that.

Be boneless, but keep your spine.
Bend and bend and bend yourself
into a bridge that you haven’t burned yet,
then cross it.

You are more than you thought you were.
Unbroken and perfect,
healing like the bruise on your knee,
singing like a hymn where the only
words are
“I saved myself.”

Swallow the old world.
Swallow the darkest it’s ever been
and then keep it down until it
surrenders.
You are here now.

You are here and you are
the forgiveness in every mouth.
You are here, and you are glowing
like early morning.

Welcome back. Welcome home.
Oct 1, 2014 / 1,845 notes
Birth books (doula, birth partner, midwife, pregnancy, breastfeeding) are so whitewashed. I love my radical doula zine and look forward to finding books on these topics written by people (especially women!) of color. Not all babies or pregnancies are white. Babies of color are just as ‘pure’, ‘innocent’, and most of all deserving of quality healthcare as white babies. Health professionals need images of that in their material.
Oct 1, 2014 / 4 notes

Birth books (doula, birth partner, midwife, pregnancy, breastfeeding) are so whitewashed. I love my radical doula zine and look forward to finding books on these topics written by people (especially women!) of color. Not all babies or pregnancies are white. Babies of color are just as ‘pure’, ‘innocent’, and most of all deserving of quality healthcare as white babies. Health professionals need images of that in their material.

A woman sitting by herself is not waiting for you.

Caitlin Stasey   (via thepeacefulterrorist)

!!!!!!!!!!!

(via black—lamb)

(via youngblackandvegan)

Oct 1, 2014 / 40,438 notes
withoutyourwalls:


Tracey Emin, Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made, 1996
Oct 1, 2014 / 2,112 notes

withoutyourwalls:

Tracey Emin, Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made, 1996

(via black--weirdo)

Oct 1, 2014 / 2,416 notes

itisrighttorebel:

UGHGHGHGGH <3________<3

Oct 1, 2014 / 3 notes

Day at the museum

Sep 30, 2014 / 242 notes

halftheskymovement:

The disturbing story of a young Ethiopian woman abused by her employers in Saudi Arabia is told through pictures. The story was based on a testimony BBC received earlier this year.

View more pictures via BBC News.

(via humanrightswatch)

victoriousvocabulary:

GAIETY
[noun]
1. the state of being gay or cheerful; gay spirits.
2. often, gaieties - merrymaking or festivity.
3. showiness; finery.
Etymology: from French gaieté, from gai, “gay”.
[Herbert James Draper - Vintage Morn]
Sep 30, 2014 / 271 notes

victoriousvocabulary:

GAIETY

[noun]

1. the state of being gay or cheerful; gay spirits.

2. often, gaieties - merrymaking or festivity.

3. showiness; finery.

Etymology: from French gaieté, from gai, “gay”.

[Herbert James Draper - Vintage Morn]

vegan-vulcan:


kropotkitten:

Tens of thousands in Hong Kong are spending the night occupying a major highway, demanding free and fair elections independent of Beijing’s influence. Beijing has responded with militarized police, and is censoring photos of the protests on social media.
Watch livestream footage

Jesus christ!!!
Sep 30, 2014 / 4,076 notes

vegan-vulcan:

kropotkitten:

Tens of thousands in Hong Kong are spending the night occupying a major highway, demanding free and fair elections independent of Beijing’s influence. Beijing has responded with militarized police, and is censoring photos of the protests on social media.

Watch livestream footage

Jesus christ!!!

(via mentalalchemy)

Sep 30, 2014 / 5 notes

It’s beginning to feel like fall.

Sep 30, 2014

gaiasfool said: are you a fan of tori amos?

There are a few songs by Tori I love to play on my own and she’s great up at the piano but as a whole I listen to different types of music. Fandom is a serious thing and I throw that devoted energy in other directions. If a friend had a concert ticket to share, I would have a good time but I don’t have any Google alerts on the matter.